Tag Archives: Roger Webber

WORKING IN PARADISE: BEST BOOKS (PART 1)

‘Micronesian Blues’ by Bryan Vila, Cynthia Morris

Having spent 9 years as a street cop, Bryan gets a job as a law enforcement specialist in Saipan. Soon after his arrival he discovers that the islands of Micronesia, although dazzlingly beautiful, will be quite a challenge.

This is a brilliant book! Exceptionally well written, funny, and very informative. Bryan recounts his experiences in a refreshingly honest manner, showing readers what it was like to be a police officer in Micronesia in the early 1980s.

‘The Coconut War: Vanuatu and the Struggle for Independence’ by Richard Shears

Richard, a journalist working for the Daily Mail, is sent to the Pacific to cover the war that has just erupted in the New Hebrides. Trying to deliver a good story, he is forced to manoeuvre his way through the complexities of the country’s politico-military situation.

Richard Shear’s account is a wonderful description of a foreign correspondent’s job. Even though it’s a history book, it’s far from being boring. Actually, it’s a page-turner that reads like the most interesting novel.

‘Solomoni – Times and Tales from Solomon Islands’ by Roger Webber

Roger, a fledgling doctor with a committed passion for helping others, travels to Solomon Islands to provide medical assistance to those in need. But as he quickly learns, treating people from a completely different culture is not always as easy as he may have thought.

If you are curious what it’s like to live and work in Melanesia, this is a perfect book for you. Filled to the brim with interesting facts and information, it will show you the real Pasifika; Pasifika like you’ve never seen it before.

‘Inside the Crocodile: The Papua New Guinea Journals’ Trish Nicholson

To fulfil her youthful desire, Trish decides to apply for an overseas job in Papua New Guinea. After being chosen, she flies to the dragon-shaped island to work on a development project. At the time she has absolutely no idea what the realities of life for a development worker in Melanesia are.

When a foreign consultant comes to a faraway country to implement and guide changes, he must know it’s going to be hard. When that foreign consultant is a woman, she must know it’s going to be very hard. You don’t believe me? Just read Trish Nicholson’s engaging memoir.

‘Up Pohnpei: Leading the ultimate football underdogs to glory’ by Paul Watson

What’s the easiest way to become an international football manager? Find a team bad enough you’ll be allowed to coach them. For Paul and Matt, that’s Pohnpei.

This hilarious book is a proof that if you can dream it, you can do it. Paul and Matt’s adventures show the different side of football – without big money, famous players, and magazine-perfect WAGs. Although their job is not always easy, it brings more satisfaction than winning the World Cup.

IDYLLIC MELANESIA

‘Thick dense cloud cover obscured the central mountain ranges of the mainland, but once out over the Solomon Sea visibility was excellent and I was enthralled at the beautiful turquoise colour of the shallow waters surrounding small islands and coral atolls which appeared to be floating in the deep blue ocean.’

Brian D. Smith, ‘Land Of The Unexpected’


‘With the morning sun, Savusavu revealed itself to be located in one of the most extraordinarily beautiful settings I had ever encountered in the islands. The town overlooked Savusavu Bay, an alluring expanse of blue water hemmed in by verdant peaks.’

J. Maarten Troost, ‘Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu’


‘The Île de Pins, touted by guidebooks to be the South Pacific’s most beautiful island even though used by Napoleon III as another Devil’s Island to incarcerate French convicts of a political nature, lies within extensive reefs at the lagoon’s eastern boundary. Like all the islands raped by loggers and sandalwood traders of the nineteenth century, its forests are gone, though a scattering of pines remains to illustrate its name. Hidden within is the landlocked lagoon of Upi, several square miles of pristine water broken only by coral mushroom islands dotted here and there and a single pirogue with rickety outrigger and ancient pointy sail to riffle the surface.’

Andrew Rayner, ‘Reach For Paradise’


‘Vanuatu is misty mountains cloaked with lush tropical rainforests dotted with quaint thatch villages next to cold bubbling springs.’

Bryan Webb, ‘The Sons Of Cannibals’


‘We now returned to the other islands in the group Vanikoro (Vanikolo) and Utupua, Vanikoro particularly impressing me with its isolated beauty. A sheer-sided mountain plunged into the fjord like inlet where the ship anchored, while in contrast a narrow strip pf land at its base housed lush meadows and the peace and tranquility of the mission school. The sun set, completing the picture; a blazing red sky setting the mountain on fire, then almost before the magnificent show had disappeared, stars showed through the evening dark and the sky was a mass of delicate lights.’

Roger Webber, ‘Solomoni: Times and Tales from Solomon Islands’

‘SOLOMONI: TIMES AND TALES FROM SOLOMON ISLANDS’ BY ROGER WEBBER

‘Solomoni: Times and Tales from Solomon Islands’ is Roger Webber’s memoir that focuses on his sojourn in the Pacific country, where he worked as a doctor for over 10 years.

SOLOMONI

Summary

Having spent his childhood in exotic Zanzibar, Roger knows exactly that helping people in developing nations is his true calling in life. So after graduating from medical school, he leaves England and together with his young family travels to Solomon Islands.

The Melanesian country proves to be a truly extraordinary place. Visiting even the smallest of villages, Roger provides medical assistance to those in need. He braves taboo mountains and flooded rivers to deliver babies, treat leprosy, and care for mentally ill Islanders. At the same time, he immerses himself in everything the archipelago has to offer: unspoiled beauty, distinctive cultures with age-old customs and traditions, rich history that still lingers in the air. These days of untroubled serenity come to an end when Roger experiences his own tragedy – the sudden death of his wife, Bridget.

Review

Hardly ever are travel memoirs considered ‘serious’ literature. They are meant to be humorous, light-hearted, and easy to enjoy. Roger Webber’s book is nothing like that. It is not amusing. It won’t make you laugh. It may, however, make you cry. Yes, it will definitely stir your emotions. And it will make you think. But most of all, it will show you the Solomon archipelago like you haven’t seen it before.

The abundance of information regarding not only Solomon Islands but also the region as a whole is truly astonishing. On over 290 pages, the author demonstrates his extensive inside knowledge of the Melanesian country and its surrounding areas. And he doesn’t limit himself to well-known facts that the majority of people, especially those interested in Pasifika, are probably already familiar with. He takes one step further and unravels the hidden secrets, letting readers explore an entirely new world. He expounds on the islands’ history, describes the settlement patterns, and delineates the cultural and linguistic links between different Pacific and Asian races. His findings and observations could not be any more fascinating. Every chapter makes you understand this particular part of the Blue Continent slightly better. You read and you learn. You read and you discover. You read and you feel the urge to dig deeper. This is exactly the effect a good piece of travel writing should have on you, don’t you agree?

Now, as I have already mentioned, the book is not only very informative but also full of emotions. Somewhere in between those revealing insights regarding the Pacific Islands, the author’s personal story can be found. It is not overly prominent and yet it tugs at your heartstrings. The chapter dedicated to the tragic air crash that took away Roger’s beloved wife Bridget and left him bringing up their miracle daughters – two of only three survivors – is quite painful to get through. Even though it is written in a rather matter-of-fact manner, you can’t help but be deeply moved.

Speaking of Mr Webber’s style, I must honestly say it is not something that deserves the highest praise. Don’t get me wrong, the memoir is decently written, but it certainly won’t leave you in awe. To put it simply, you’ll find more value in the book’s substance than its style.

All things considered, ‘Solomoni’ is a great read. It does not disappoint. Unique photographs beautifully illustrate the author’s words, showing you the real Solomon Islands.