Tag Archives: Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo

AMERICAN SAMOA BY LYNN PULOU-ALAIMALO

American Samoa. Where to go? What to see? What to do? Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo, an emerging author from the Pacific Islands, gives her recommendations (this week we change The 3s for The 4s).

Visit the Turtle and Shark site in Vaitogi

The story behind this site in the village of Vaitogi is about a mother Fonuea and her daughter, who swam from Upolu-Savaii (Western Samoa) to Tutuila (American Samoa) to seek survival. During the famine days in the village of Salega, they swam to American Samoa in forms of a turtle and shark, until they arrived at the beach of Vaitogi. They turned back into their human form and met Chief Letuli. The village welcomed them. Upon receiving food and clothing, Fonuea thanked Chief Letuli for the love shown towards her and her daughter. She also proclaimed with gratitude to the chief that they will live under the cliffs of the Vaitogi Beach, and if the villagers should ever want to see her and her daughter – they can sing the chant of Fonuea, and they will reveal themselves on the ocean’s surface. The legendary tale has long passed, but the proclamation between Chief Letuli and Fonuea is still alive and preserved by the village of Vaitogi today. The Turtle and Shark site in Vaitogi have become one of the most visited sites in the South Pacific by world tourists. Every time the villagers chants the melody of Fonuea, the turtle and shark reveal themselves to villagers and guests. Become familiar with the song so you can sing along when you visit Vaitogi, American Samoa.

Laumei, faiaga, faasusu si au tama

Aumai le moega’afa- fa’i mai, fa’i mai

Se lauti o laulelei, e lavalava le laumei

Fonuea, Fonuea, laulau mai se manamea

Po o sa i luga nei

Sa Letuli i luga nei

A ua’ina, a la’ina

A solo e mata’ina

Lou galu tu’u la le i’a

Lalelei, lalelei,l alelei!

Visit the National Park of American Samoa

Colonization monuments, World War II artifacts, lands preserved and rare indigenous animals grant tourists an enjoyable quest when they visit American Samoa. One of the large sightseeing parks in American Samoa is in the village of Vatia. It takes a few minutes to drive past steep hills to get there, but you will not ever pass up another tour to Vatia once you discover the breathtaking view of the Polatai and Polauta mountains, lands and natural spring water flowing in from the mountains.

Hike Mount Alava

Hiking up Mount Alava is becoming a point of marathons and sightseeing for tourists and locals. Mount Alava is another mountain monumentally used by the territory for communication signals to reach each village in the territory. From Mount Alava, you can view the capital of Pago Pago, the central wharf of American Samoa in Fagatog unto the outskirt views of the Molioleava Point on the left and the Fatu ma Futi mountains on the right. The boomerang outlook from Mount Alava is best seen before sunrise.

Visit Tisa’s Barefoot Bar in Alega

Privately owned by the lovely Tisa, Tisa’s Barefoot Bar is another great place to relish the view of dolphins while enjoying a cocktail and seafood delight at the ravishing bar in Alega. There are numerous activities and events held at Tisa’s annually. There is a Tattoo or Tatau Festival hosted there every year, where local artists and tattooists can exhibit their talent in tattooing a Samoan traditional tattoo sogaimiti – for men, malu – for women, or any Samoan tattoo. This event also serves our locals and guests in a classic show to display or model their tattoos. Aside from the ongoing activities, there is more to enjoy besides scuba diving and surfing. There’s Rainforest Jungle Tours, Tisa’s Marine Reserve Tours, and Aunu’u Island Tours. The tour to Aunu’u Island is a must!

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A CHAT WITH… LYNN PULOU-ALAIMALO

Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo is a) a thoroughly wonderful person (and I mean WONDERFUL!) and b) a very talented writer. She has recently published two books, one of which is a short non-fiction work about the village of Lauli’i in American Samoa. If you want to know why Molioleava holds a special place in the author’s heart, read the interview.

LYNN PULOU-ALAIMALO

Pasifika Truthfully: You wrote a very interesting book – a short story, to be exact – about the village of Lauli’i, American Samoa. Why did you decide to do it?

Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo: Thank you. Yes, I did. When I explored publishing options, I garnered a feeling of exemplification. I wanted to write about something I knew rather than something I could have explosively created with imagination. So, I wrote about this crater. For years, I called Molioleava ‘the life of American Samoa’. Without it, there wouldn’t be any telephone services, cable networks, television services and communication among the local territory. But there was another thing that no one knew about Molioleava. Molioleava is also the burial grounds of my ancestors. In sacrificing their resting grounds, surrounding them are antennas serving the territory.

PT: What does the place mean to the islands? Why is it so important?

LPA: The Molioleava or Harbor Light in the village of Lauli’i, American Samoa is a huge point of infrastructure for the island of American Samoa. Because of the elevation of this crater, majority of the antennas and telecommunication lines are seated on the crater. Installed on this crater also is the harbor light that guides ships and boats into the inner wharf or port of the territory.

PT: There are quite a few ghost stories about Molioleava. Can you share some of them?

LPA: There’s quite many for visitors and guests. From the blonde hair lady who stands by the lone coconut tree in the mountain to an appearance of people waving from the harbor light when ships pass by at night. There’s a track of sand that leads far up the road to the harbor light before sunrise, that most elders used to call ‘a path for spirits’ (ala o’o.) As a true flesh and blood of this land, I can only imagine the stories that people convey. I also think that there are unordinary things beyond our control or those who had once occupied the lands still guarding lands and family. I only think of sudden neck hairs standing up as guardians just passing by when I’m in the area.

PT: Your family comes from the village of Lauli’i. Can you tell me something more about this place?

LPA: The harbor light, or Molioleava, is a general name for the crater or the mountain. In Samoan, the word moli means light, ava is the deep-sea. To my family, this crater has its own name and meaning. This land is called Namumeaavaga, a Samoan word meaning ‘the fragrance’ or odor of the deceased. This land was the very first area our ancestors first settled from the island of Manu’a to have their ava (kava) upon arrival. The two sons of the King of Manu’a (Tuimanu’a), Sua and Vaifanua, sailed out and found the village of Lauli’i. When they settled by the crater, they bid farewell from one another. Vaifanua went to Vatia, my ancestor Sua stayed in Lauli’i. This mountain was the focal point where Tuimanu’a could see his sons from Ta’u, Manu’a. It is also an area very dusky at night, almost like a hindrance to ships when they sail in. Another remarkable history behind this mountain are the colonization days when the United States Naval artifacts and artilleries were placed by the Breaker’s Point and on the obverse end of crater. Those monuments are still sitting there today and managed by the National Park. Starkist, one of the biggest manufactory in the territory hosts many licensed fishing vessels annually. Some Korean ships that encountered hardships with the crater sunk and are still seated on the outskirts of the Molioleava.

PT: Is this your favourite place on the Planet Earth?

LPA: Molioleava would be my most favorite place on Earth. As many people say, ‘Home is where the heart is.’ Molioleava or Namumeaavaga surrounds my humble abode in Lauli’i.

PT: What does American Samoa mean to you?

LPA: It is my home and a respective title I epitomize everywhere I go. I have roots in both Samoan archipelagos, but American Samoa is where I was born and raised. I always think of the territory as a remote dot on the map, with power to its lands and its own facilitated Constitution. My homeland is like a gem carted in my journeys and milestones. While not many people know where American Samoa is, the only way they’ll be able to remember American Samoa is through the NFL players Marcus Mariota, Domata Peko, Joey Iosefa and many more. Another way the world would easily remember American Samoa is by its beauty of turquoise beaches, lush mountains, annual cruise ships, and tourism – the cannibalism memorial in Aoloau, the outrigger and long boat races, the Tale of the Turtle and Shark, the inner wharf that guarded US Navy ships in during the Tripartite Convention, preservation of the Samoan culture, the rides to Aunu’u Island, quiet Sundays, the family oriented people and a homeland with a huge quota of American Samoans serving in the United States military. Essentially, American Samoa is my home.

PT: Do you feel more American or Samoan?

LPA: I always feel that I could blend in with any ethnicity and feel happy with an open mind than share a faction of where I represent. However, I feel that there is more of me in both. For instance, while English is still my second language, I use both English and Samoan to communicate and translate anything to better understand it. I practice my Samoan culture everywhere I go. I excuse myself when I walk by people. I fathom the word, Faafetai – meaning thank you. There is respect rendered for anyone. And no matter where I venture out to, I never forget where I am from. On the American side, I am a proud veteran of the United States Army. I served this country and went to wars and protected the freedom of not only this country, but also my homeland of American Samoa. If there is one thing I’m most proud of in my life, it would be this sacrifice for world peace, freedom for mankind facing genocide, and the love for people. With my Samoan culture manifested in all that I do, I find the best in both worlds as a citizen of good faith.

PT: Do you plan to visit the islands anytime soon?

LPA: I just returned a few months ago. Since I left home in 2000, I’ve always traveled back to visit family. It’s so hard to board the plane after weeks of eating German buns and round pancakes in Fagatogo. Everything moves rapidly in the world. Like in Bulgaria, you’ll never find someone walking as if they’re walking in a park. In Heidelberg, every one counts down to Oktoberfest like it’s nothing. And then there’s old sweet Wisconsin, where time just flies right over the marshes of cranberry country. When that Hawaiian Airline lands in Pago Pago International Airport, everything goes on pause. Vacation hashtag goes up!

‘MOLIOLEAVA’ BY LYNN PULOU-ALAIMALO

‘Molioleava’ is the story of Lauli’i, a village in American Samoa, as told by the author, Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo.

MOLIOLEAVA

Summary

To most unitiated people the hill that stands guard over the inner wharf of American Samoa may just be a source of light that guides ships safely to the harbour. But to Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo, Molioleava is the life and heart of the country.

This beautiful part of the village of Lauli’i is the abode of her ancestors – their burial grounds. It’s a place where the present interlaces with the past; a place that requires remembrance and respect.

Review

Hardly ever do we think about that, but every book – whether it’s fiction or non-fiction – must possess certain elements. It needs, for example, a main character – an individual around whom a story revolves. It also requires a setting, that is a location where the aforementioned character experiences his or her adventures. But what if the main character and the setting are one and the same thing?

It happens; sometimes a place indeed is the protagonist and the absolute focal point of the book. But in ‘Molioleava’, the described location is even more than that. This is the reason why this short publication is quite an oddity; a rare bird that appears in the sky to amaze people. It may be just a few pages long, but it is a substantial volume that provides readers with a great deal of information regarding one of the most important and – as it turns out – fascinating sites in American Samoa.

Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo relates the story in a somewhat journalistic manner. Very quickly you get an impression of reading a newspaper article, in which the author reports bare facts, adorning them occasionally with a little more personal tales. The text skips nimbly from one subject to another, painting a very thorough picture in your head. Everything, from the geography of the place to its history and mythology to the significance for the island’s infrastructure, is comprehensively covered. You feel well versed when you finish the last sentence. And you certainly feel intrigued to get to know Molioleava even better, for this work really sparks interest. As befits a fine writer, Ms. Alaimalo pulls readers into a unique world and then leaves them wanting more.

Now, despite the abundance of information, the book is one of those that you may think end before they really start. It is a very slim volume, a ‘quick read’ in the purest form. It seems that Lynn Pulou-Alaimalo is a lady of few words, because the brevity of her story is quite surprising, especially when juxtaposed with the amount of knowledge it presents. Well, don’t let the length fool you – it may be a slim volume, but it is extremely pithy. The author hit the right note – the book is complete without being mundane. And boredom, let’s be honest here, would not be so difficult to achieve taking into account the very specific subject matter.

The substance definitely satisfies, but the style is equally good. Unnecessary descriptions have been left out, and yet the place is depicted so vividly you have no troubles conjuring it up in your imagination. The harbour light and the crown of antennas appear right before your eyes, and you can sense a subtle aura of mystery. Skillfully written in clear and concise language, this story is a real pleasure to read.

Books like this are not being published every day, which is reason enough to reach for this title. It’s arresting and enlightening. It’s simply unique.