Category Archives: BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

TRUTHFUL DEPICTION IN FICTION (PART 1)

The Scarlet Series by Lani Wendt Young

Every culture has its own taboos, topics that are forbidden to discuss, little secrets no one should know about. Lani Wendt Young isn’t scared to unravel even the most distressing truths. Her newest series is funny and light-hearted on the surface, but beneath all the cheerfulness one discovers the darker side of paradise.

These are romance books that show Samoa in a way it’s rarely seen.

‘Where We Once Belonged’ by Sia Figiel

A coming-of-age story set in Samoa and penned by a Samoan writer? Yes please!

This outstanding – and probably quite shocking to a foreign reader – novel is an exceptional explanation of the Samoan culture that touches on the subject of personal and social identity and the dominance of the latter over the former. Although written in a poetic manner, it is solidly anchored in reality.

The Materena Mahi Trilogy by Célestine Hitiura Vaite

This light-hearted series is a wonderful way to ‘see’ and understand (at least to some extent) Tahitian culture. Célestine Hitiura Vaite takes readers on a guided tour, showing them what it really means to live on the island many believe is the quintessence of romance. But is it really? Well, everyday life in the town of Faa’a may not be romantic, but it sure is full of excitement.

A wonderful – and gripping – journey to French Polynesia. One you don’t want to miss!

‘A Farm in the South Pacific Sea’ by Jan Walker

What does it mean to be a palangi businesswoman in Tonga in the 1960s and 1970s? Jan Walker’s novel provides a fantastic answer to this question. Despite being a fictionalized account of actual events (the story is based on the author’s cousin’s experiences), it offers invaluable insights into the life in the South Pacific kingdom.

This is a cross-cultural love story that moves, surprises, inspires, and educates.

‘Scar of the Bamboo Leaf’ by Sieni A.M.

Sieni A.M.’s book cannot be praised enough. Not only does it portray a touching and thought-provoking story, but it also lets readers immerse themselves in the world of Samoan customs and traditions, so deeply-rooted in the local culture. With this novel one can pay a visit to 21st-century Samoa and still explore the country’s ancient ways.

Marvelous read, pure and simple.

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GREAT SUMMER READS (2015)

‘The Happy Isles of Oceania: Paddling the Pacific’ by Paul Theroux

Having just separated from his wife and facing the possibility of being diagnosed with cancer, Paul comes to the conclusion that the best way to forget his problems is to set out on a journey. So he quickly agrees to go on a book tour in Australia and New Zealand and whilst there, he decides that it would actually be fun to travel across the Pacific using an inflatable canoe.

As he paddles the vast ocean, he visits the black islands of Melanesia; the grand archipelagos and tiny atolls of Polynesia; and the one and only, heavenly Paradise. The farther he goes, the merrier he gets. Because in the Blue Continent, everyone finds their bliss.

This is one of the greatest travel books ever written and a perfect summer read. Paul Theroux’s words will transport you to the most alluring exotic lands, introduce you to the most incredible societies, and let you discover the most fascinating cultures you can encounter. This is the great Pacific as seen through the eyes of a cynical Westerner.

‘Gallivanting on Guam’ by Dave Slagle

After being offered a job on Guam, Dave moves to the tiny Micronesian country, not really sure what to expect.

As he lands on the island, he finds himself in a world very different from anything he has experienced so far. Although Guam seems quite surreal, Dave realizes he needs to adapt to the new surroundings in order to fully enjoy his little sojourn. So he does exactly what the natives do: he visits local bars, sings karaoke, and flirts with beautiful girls. And when he thinks that his life could not be any better, everything starts to fall apart.

Despite being somewhat controversial, Dave Slagle’s account is a page-turner that entertains and educates at the same time. It’s a light, often hilariously funny, read that will show you Guam like you haven’t seen it before.

‘The Miss Tutti Frutti Contest: Travel Tales of the South Pacific’ by Graeme Lay

For Graeme Lay, the South Pacific is unquestionably the most appealing corner of our globe. Travelling from island to island, he absorbs the enchanting atmosphere of Polynesia, learning what it really means to spend time in paradise.

Whenever he goes, he meets intriguing locals and even more intriguing foreigners. He familiarizes himself with the unique cultures of the region and does everything possible to get to know the many secrets it hides.

This book is like a sweet, tasty summer cocktail. The perfectly mixed collection of stories and tales will take you to the fabulous places not many people have had a chance to see. You will have fun, and you will laugh whenever you take this refreshing title in your hands.

‘Where the hell is Tuvalu?’ by Philip Ells

Looking to escape the office treadmill, Philip agrees to become the People’s Lawyer of the fourth-smallest country in the world.

Tuvalu, his new adopted home, turns out to be quite a challenging place to live and work. As he learns to deal with everyday obstacles, he tries to perform his legal duties as best he can. Which is not an easy thing to do taking into account that he is forced to handle a wide variety of criminal offenses, from a slightly amusing pig theft to extremely difficult and heartbreaking domestic violence.

If the author of a book is British, you may assume that the publication will be laugh-out-loud funny. And this personal memoir certainly is funny. Funny, witty, and thought-provoking. Although it’s written in a light-hearted manner, it touches on a few sensitive subjects. Well, no one has ever said that a summer read can’t make you ponder important issues, right?

‘Reach for Paradise’ by Andrew Rayner

Motivated by his dream of visiting the Blue Continent, Andrew buys an old steel ketch and without hesitation starts his voyage through the Pacific Ocean.

What he discovers along the way amazes him. The breathtaking beauty and the irresistible charm of each country, archipelago, and atoll attract him with an almost magnetic force. With every nautical mile he sails, his desire to get to know the serene places grows stronger.

Andrew Rayner’s memoir will make you crave Pasifika. Literally. It is a beautiful book that perfectly conveys the beauty of the region, making you want to leave everything behind and travel to the islands of tranquil delights.

BEST BOOKS ABOUT COOK ISLANDS

‘Cannibals and Converts: Radical Change in the Cook Islands’ by Maretu

This is probably the best book to read if you want to learn about the Cook Islands’ past. Written by Maretu in the Rarotongan language (translated into English by Marjorie Tuainekore Crocombe), it tells the story of the archipelago immediately before the arrival of Europeans.

The author wonderfully describes how and in what ways the Westerners changed the local culture, and how the native inhabitants had to adjust to the new order established by those who had suddenly appeared on their shores. Fantastic, enlightening publication well worth your time and attention!

‘Mātini’ by Rachel Reeves

In 2014, Rachel Reeves was commissioned to write a book that would document the stories of Cyclone Martin survivors. She was given seven months. And she created a masterpiece.

‘Mātini’ is a detailed account of the tragic events that took place in the Cook Islands on November 1st, when the tropical cyclone nearly destroyed Manihiki Atoll. Although the author portrays the catastrophic occurrences in a rather matter-of-fact manner, the book is deeply touching and emotional. It is also extremely thought-provoking and surprisingly revealing. Simply put, it is a true gem you should have on your bookshelf.

‘Don’t Walk Under the Coconuts’ by Robert Borden

I don’t think any other book conveys the tranquil atmosphere of the Cook Islands better than Robert Borden’s memoir. His words paint a vivid picture of Aitutaki, where Robert and his wife Mary Lou used to spend the winter months.

If you wish to experience life in the tropics – get to know the locals, discover their culture, ‘do’ what they do every single day – this is a perfect title for you. It will transport you to one of the most beautiful places on planet Earth the moment you start reading the first chapter. Fantastic way to enjoy the Cooks from the comfort of your home!

‘The Book of Puka-Puka’ by Robert Dean Frisbie

This is a classic of the South Seas genre and a must-read for anyone interested in the Cook Islands. Samoa had Robert Louis Stevenson. The Cooks had Robert Dean Frisbie.

‘Ropati’ knew the archipelago probably better than any other sailor that has ever visited it. His wonderful memoir about the years he spent on the atoll of Puka-Puka is not only an extremely entertaining piece of literature but also a gold mine of information that offers detailed, often humorous descriptions of island life in the Pacific. The book was written in the 1920s, but some of the Frisbie’s observations are still relevant today.

‘Miss Ulysses from Puka-Puka: The Autobiography of a South Sea Trader’s Daughter’ by Florence Johnny Frisbie

Robert Dean Frisbie’s book is a classic, but his daughter’s autobiography – although incomparably less known – is equally worthy of note. Written from a young girl’s perspective, it shows a different side to life in the Cook Islands.

In this fascinating memoir, Florence Johnny Frisbie tells her version of the story. It is simpler than her father’s, definitely not as thorough and sophisticated. And this is exactly why it makes for such an unusually interesting read. Puka-Puka may be just a small atoll. However, for little Miss Frisbie it was a whole world packed with delightful adventures… Just try to imagine how delightful her reminiscences are.

BEST BOOKS ABOUT FIJI

‘Bula Pops!: A Memoir of a Son’s Peace Corps Service in the Fiji Islands’ by Michael J. Blahut, Michael J. Blahut III

This is unquestionably one of the best books about Fiji you’ll ever hold in your hands. Written by a father/son duo, the memoir is particularly recommended for those who would like to get to know the peculiarities of Fijian culture.

The extremely interesting narrative is filled with descriptions of local customs, traditions, practices, habits, and beliefs, which are not only informative but also very entertaining and enjoyable to read. Especially worthy of note are the younger Blahut’s observations – you can’t help but marvel at his intercultural competence.

‘Our Wealth Is Loving Each Other: Self and Society in Fiji’ by Karen J. Brison

Karen J. Brison’s book is a wonderful anthropological study that examines the challenges indigenous Fijians face as they try to reconcile their traditional values with modernity. The author shares stories of various individuals who prove that it is indeed possible to live according to the way of the chiefs without giving up personal autonomy.

The book may not be light-hearted in nature, but it is an immensely engaging read that sheds some light on cultural contradictions between the old and the new.

‘Dodging Machetes: How I Survived Forbidden Love, Bad Behavior, and the Peace Corps in Fiji’ by Will Lutwick

If you are interested in multiculturalism in Fiji, Will Lutwick’s memoir is something you should read. This quite incredible story of a Peace Corps volunteer who falls in love with a rebellious girl from a traditional Hindu family provides fascinating insights into the world of Indo-Fijian community.

The author’s wit, charm, and delightful sense of humour that can be found on every single page make the book a real treat for everyone who appreciates good literature that entertains, enlightens, and educates.

‘Kava in the Blood: A Personal & Political Memoir from the Heart of Fiji’ by Peter Thomson

As the title says, this book is a memoir – personal, because it’s basically the author’s autobiography; and political, because it describes the coups d’etat that took place in Fiji in 1987. And if you think it’s impossible to weave together such distinct strands, this title will prove you wrong.

Peter Thomson delivers a fascinating tale that is an eye-opener. With unconditional love for the Melanesian country, he paints a painful picture of its past, letting readers understand how certain events shaped the Fijian nation.

‘Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu’ by J. Maarten Troost

Fiji with a dose of humour? You know that you can count on J. Maarten Troost. His tongue-in-cheek memoir is a terrific piece of travel literature that captivates from the very first to the very last sentence.

Even though the author doesn’t write much about the Fijian culture, he unravels the secrets of daily life in the tropics – he shows the good, the bad, and the ugly. As always, he is honest and amusing. As always, he is absolutely brilliant. Immerse in his book and you’ll discover the real Fiji.

GREAT ANTHROPOLOGICAL READS ABOUT PACIFIC ISLANDS (PART 2)

‘Tahitians: Mind and Experience in the Society Islands’ by Robert I. Levy

If you want to get to know Tahitians, you should read Robert Levy’s book. It’s as good as an anthropological study can get.

Levy visited Society Islands in the early 1960s and worked there for 26 months. During that time he lived among Tahitians and became acquainted with their distinctive ways of being. His publication covers a wide range of topics, from moral behaviour to love and relationships to personal psychological organization. It is a must-read for everyone interested in French Polynesia.

‘Tokelau: A Historical Ethnography’ by Judith Huntsman, Antony Hooper

There are very few books about Tokelau, which is reason enough to reach for Judith Huntsman and Antony Hooper’s title. Plus, it’s a really valuable piece of ethnohistory that not only examines the archipelago’s traditional lifestyle but also elaborates on its bygone times.

In nine chapters, the authors try to explain how Tokelau’s past relates to its present, and in what way it shaped the nation’s indigenous culture. Their focus on all three atolls makes the book an exceptionally comprehensive and equally enlightening study.

‘Argonauts of the Western Pacific: An Account of Native Enterprise and Adventure in the Archipelagoes of Melanesian New Guinea’ by Bronislaw Malinowski

This is yet another classic in the canon of Pacific Islands non-fiction literature. Bronislaw Malinowski was, without the slightest doubt, one of the most influential social anthropologists of all time, and his works are still today regarded as groundbreaking in their field.

In this particular book, the author investigates the complex trading system conducted in the Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea. Since the publication of his account, the Kula Ring has gained much attention, however no one has ever described it in such meticulous detail as Malinowski did. A truly fantastic volume!

‘Tungaru Traditions: Writings on the Atoll Culture of the Gilbert Islands’ by Arthur F. Grimble, Henry Evans Maude

Sir Arthur Grimble is perhaps best recognized for his memoir that recounts his time in Kiribati and Tuvalu (formerly the Gilbert and Ellice Islands), where he worked after joining the Colonial Office. Not many people know, however, that he also wrote another book – an immensely engaging ethnography based on fieldwork he carried out in the Gilberts.

‘Tungaru Traditions’, which was edited and published by Henry Evans Maude, provides significant insight into Gilbertese culture: customs, habits, rituals, practices; social organization; history; and even mythology. Not only is it compelling but also very pleasantly written.

‘Traditional Micronesian Societies: Adaptation, Integration, and Political Organization’ by Glenn Petersen

Glenn Petersen’s publication is one of the best books on Micronesia ever penned. It is extremely thorough and yet surprisingly detailed. The clearly structured content is presented in lively prose that is quite appealing even to those who aren’t very fond of academic writing.

The author describes Micronesian communities, aiming his attention at their organization around interlocking lineages and clans. This theme constitutes the focal point of the study. Petersen scrupulously explains the significance of this unusual social system, so that readers can fully understand the complexity of the Pacific’s northwest region.

GREAT ANTHROPOLOGICAL READS ABOUT PACIFIC ISLANDS (PART 1)

‘Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilisation’ by Margaret Mead

This widely recognized book is a fieldwork classic. It details Margaret Mead’s journey to the South Pacific, where she had a chance to study the lives of teenage Samoan girls in the early 1920s.

Focusing on everything from education to sexuality, the author not only described one of the most fascinating Polynesian cultures, but also compared it to its American counterpart. After so many years, it’s still a brilliant read – interesting, well-written, insightful.

‘Nest in the Wind: Adventures in Anthropology on a Tropical Island’ by Martha C. Ward

Martha C. Ward first came to the island of Pohnpei in the 1970s. That little sojourn resulted in her marvelous anthropological study of the local people and their folkways. 30 years later she decided to return to the FSM to discover what had changed since her initial visit.

In this second edition of her original work the author unravels the peculiarities of life in the tropics, putting emphasis on the evolution of Micronesian culture. An absolute must-read!

‘Becoming Tongan: An Ethnography of Childhood’ by Helen Morton

Helen Morton’s book is a wonderful analysis of childhood in Tonga, in which she delineates all the processes associated with this crucial period in people’s lives.

Being married to a Tongan and having lived in the kingdom for over three years, she demonstrates a high level of competence in understanding the South Pacific ‘way of being’. In her study she traces the patterns of children’s socialization – from being ‘vale’ to becoming ‘poto’ – with great care and attention to detail. This makes her account an immensely engaging read.

‘Literacy, Emotion, and Authority: Reading and Writing on a Polynesian Atoll’ by Niko Besnier

This is a very interesting publication as it investigates literacy practices on the Nukulaelae atoll in Tuvalu.

Niko Besnier, Professor of Cultural Anthropology, visited the Ellice Islands numerous times between 1979 – 1985. During those sojourns he became interested in everyday forms of literacy and began to examine the close relationship between language, culture, and personhood. The result? A rather academic but certainly fascinating book.

‘Gender Rituals: Female Initiation in Melanesia’ by Nancy Lutkehaus, Paul Roscoe

Initiation rituals constitute an important subject matter in anthropological studies, and yet there aren’t many titles that cover this topic in regard to Pacific communities. Edited by Nancy Lutkehaus and Paul Roscoe book is one of such publications.

Throughout the volume, the authors analyse practices of eight different cultural groups of Papua New Guinea (mainly the Sepik region), explaining how they influence and shape the local societies. Although focused on women, the book will definitely be of great interest for both genders.

BEST BOOKS ABOUT FEDERATED STATES OF MICRONESIA

‘Making sense of Micronesia: The Logic of Pacific Island Culture’ by Francis X. Hezel

This is a fantastic book that should be read by every single person planning to visit the FSM. Written by Francis X. Hezel, a Jesuit priest who has lived and worked in this Pacific country since 1963, it provides all the necessary information regarding Micronesian culture, letting readers understand the often unfamiliar island ways.

It should be noted that the author doesn’t focus on the FSM only, but on the vast area from Palau to the Marshalls. Drawing on his first-hand experience, he describes the peculiarities of each nation’s character, explains attitudes and real-life behaviours of the inhabitants, analyzes the patterns of values and sets of beliefs. The result? Educational, enlightening, very entertaining publication that is a true joy to read.

‘Nest in the Wind: Adventures in Anthropology on a Tropical Island’ by Martha C. Ward

Martha C. Ward’s book is a must-read for people who are interested not only in Micronesia but also in anthropology, ethnography, or cross-cultural communication. It is a comprehensive study of customs, traditions, habits, practices, beliefs, behaviours, and attitudes of the Pohnpeian (yes, the author devotes her attention to the Pohnpei State) people.

Although unbelievably detailed and insightful, this is not an academic publication. It’s actually an engaging account of one woman’s discoveries in the tropical paradise, written in a pleasant and very appealing way.

‘Micronesian Blues’ by Bryan Vila, Cynthia Morris

Bryan Vila’s memoir that chronicles his adventures in Micronesia is undoubtedly one of the best books ever written about this beautiful part of our globe. Vila, together with Cynthia Morris, managed to create a compelling narrative that wonderfully explains the realities of life not only in the FSM but also in the Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, the Marshalls, and Guam.

Delivered in a light-hearted and humorous manner, the story provides the most interesting, little-known facts about Micronesian cultures – Chuukese, Kosraean, Yapese, and Pohnpeian among others. By no means is this an anthropological study, nevertheless one may learn quite a lot from Bryan’s experiences (good and bad) in a foreign land. Thoroughly engaging from start to finish!

‘Nowhere Slow: Eleven Years in Micronesia’ by Jonathan Gourlay

Jonathan Gourlay is an outstandingly talented writer, so it comes as no surprise that this little collection of essays about his sojourn in Pohnpei is such an enjoyable read. It’s hilariously funny, extremely revealing, and unusually honest.

Micronesia was Jonathan’s home for 11 years – during that time he was neither a local nor a complete stranger. As he presents his point of view, he shows the Pohnpeian way of life from a new, very interesting perspective, making readers realize how difficult it is to adapt to an entirely different culture. You can’t help but marvel at Jonathan’s writings, and his book is well worth your time and attention.

‘Up Pohnpei: Leading the ultimate football underdogs to glory’ by Paul Watson

Can a book about football serve as a source of knowledge about Micronesian culture? Well, Paul Watson proves it can. His memoir about coaching the Pohnpei’s national soccer team is an amusing, inspirational read that unravels a few things you may not have known about the islands and their inhabitants.

Of course, with its strong focus on sport, the title may be a little disappointing for those who expect to find here an abundance of information regarding the FSM. However, despite this (minor) drawback, it’s still a book that sheds some light on the country that receives very limited coverage in literature.

BEST LAUGH-OUT-LOUD BOOKS (PART 2)

‘Where the hell is Tuvalu?’ by Philip Ells

When a young lawyer from the City of London suddenly ends up in one of the smallest countries on the planet Earth, where literally everything is new and different, you can be sure that’s a promise of great fun. Philip Ells’s memoir certainly doesn’t disappoint. His unforgettable experiences are depicted in a candid, casual, and very jovial manner, which is both engaging and extremely pleasurable to read. What can I say… No one does humour quite like the Brits!

‘Gallivanting on Guam’ by Dave Slagle

Although somewhat controversial among Chamorro communities, this is an interesting book. It’s not only very insightful in terms of providing valuable information regarding Guam, its history, culture, and traditions but also highly amusing and – this may come as a surprise to many – really well paced and plotted. And even the fact that the travelogue has some flaws cannot ruin your reading enjoyment.

‘Micronesian Blues’ by Bryan Vila, Cynthia Morris

Bryan Vila’s memoir is the most hilarious account of a cross-cultural adventure you can find. It has absolutely everything a good travel book should have: entertaining story (it’s a page-turner that reads like a novel), vivid descriptions (yes, you can almost feel the tropical breeze), fascinating insights (it teaches, informs, enlightens), fantastic sense of humour (oh, see for yourself). This chronicle of one cop’s experiences in a foreign land captures attention, making readers roar with laughter.

‘Solomon Time: Adventures in the South Pacific’ by Will Randall

Will Randall’s book is an odyssey well worth your time. This rather improbable yet true story of an English teacher who travels to the Solomon Islands with the object of fulfilling a dying man’s wish could not be any more delightful. A wonderfully constructed narrative is embellished with humorous anecdotes and amusing scenes that are simply too funny not to be read.

‘Up Pohnpei: Leading the ultimate football underdogs to glory’ by Paul Watson

This is a book with so many layers to it. It takes readers to the magical island of Pohnpei to show them how passion, determination, and belief can make the impossible possible. It embodies the true spirit of sport, letting people discover the sheer joy it brings. But most of all, it makes everyone laugh. It’s a thoroughly enjoyable, inspirational (beyond words), heart-warming, richly comic travelogue written for love of the game. Beautiful and entertaining!

BEST LAUGH-OUT-LOUD BOOKS (PART 1)

‘The Happy Isles of Oceania: Paddling the Pacific’ by Paul Theroux

Paul Theroux never fails to deliver a compelling story. His travelogue – which is a truly wonderful journey across the Pacific Ocean – provides fascinating insights into the islands of the Blue Continent, giving readers a chance to absorb its undeniable charm. This informative, enthralling, witty, and – most of all – genuinely funny account captures attention right from the beginning. It simply could not be written any better. Ultimate reading enjoyment is guaranteed.

‘The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific’, ‘Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu’, ‘Headhunters on My Doorstep: A True Treasure Island Ghost Story’ by J. Maarten Troost

J. Maarten Troost’s ‘South Pacific trilogy’ is everything you’d ever want from travel literature. Not only do the books let you ‘experience’ different cultures, but they also give you the opportunity to see them through the eyes of another human being. The author’s adventures keep you absolutely riveted, and his astonishing sense of humour makes each story a pleasure to read. Phenomenal work!

‘Dodging Machetes: How I Survived Forbidden Love, Bad Behavior, and the Peace Corps in Fiji’ by Will Lutwick

Finding love in a tropical paradise… How cheesy is that? Well, Will Lutwick proves that even such ‘ordinary’ story can be turned into a thrilling and highly amusing narrative. This thought-provoking memoir is a real page-turner. Finely created with a good dose of jocularity and intelligence, it not only entertains but most of all enlightens and educates.

‘Nowhere Slow: Eleven Years in Micronesia’ by Jonathan Gourlay

This is a truly wonderful, brilliantly written collection of essays. Even though some of the stories deal with quite serious subjects, Jonathan Gourlay’s wit and delightful wry humour lighten the overall tone of the book, making it almost hilariously funny. One thing you should bear in mind: this is not a title for very young readers!

‘Bula: Sailing Across the Pacific’ by Bryan Carson

Bryan Carson’s travelogue is pure entertainment, nothing more and nothing less. It’s a fantastic adventure story written in a light-hearted manner that makes you smile from the very first to the very last page. If you have ever dreamt about cruising the Pacific, hopping from island to island, and meeting new people – this is a book for you.

GREAT SUMMER READS (2014)

‘Bula: Sailing Across the Pacific’ by Bryan Carson

Bryan, bored with his corporate job, decides to fulfil his dream and cruise the Pacific Ocean. He buys a boat and, together with his friend Figman, begins a great adventure.

After a short stop in Mexico, Bryan sails to French Polynesia, Hawaii, Kiribati, Tonga, American Samoa, Fiji, and New Caledonia. Along the way he meets a variety of people, both native Islanders and foreign visitors, makes some new friends, and has a lot of fun while discovering the wonders of the Blue Continent.

This is a brilliant story created to entertain readers and give them a little bit of enjoyment. Written with a fantastic sense of humour, it will make you laugh out loud from the very first page. A truly compelling read for one of those lazy summer days!

‘An Afternoon in Summer’ by Kathy Giuffre

Kathy, a single mother of two young boys, decides to spend her sabbatical year researching indigenous art of Rarotonga. Eager to live on a tropical island, she packs her sons and together they set off on a magical adventure.

After arriving in the Cooks, Kathy finds out that they have no place to stay. Her unlikely saviour is Emily, an 82-year-old Maori lady, who offers them a room in her house by the ocean.

This beautiful and heart-warming book is a must-read for every woman who dreams of escaping from reality, forgetting about problems, and decamping to an almost ideal location. It’s a touching story that inspires, evokes emotions, and stirs the soul.

‘The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific’ by J. Maarten Troost

At the age of 26, Maarten moves to Kiribati with his girlfriend Sylvia. Soon after arrival, their expectations of a tropical paradise are brutally shattered into pieces. The spectacular corner of the globe turns out to be a polluted, dirty island where one needs to find a way to survive while being ‘surrounded’ by the rhythms of ‘La Macarena’.

Nevertheless, Maarten and Sylvia learn how to enjoy the simple pleasures of life and after two years are reluctant to go home.

It seems that only J. Maarten Troost can create such a brilliantly written, humorous story that captures attention and simply doesn’t let go. It is a thoroughly engaging travelogue filled with hilarious anecdotes and some thought-provoking reminiscences that will leave you wondering what’s really important in life.

‘Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu’ by J. Maarten Troost

Upon returning from Kiribati, Maarten takes a job at the World Bank. His new, buttoned-down life quickly makes him tired. He misses the islands of the South Seas and dreams of another escape. Luckily for him, his wife Sylvia is offered a position in Vanuatu.

As they land in Melanesia, they are eager to immerse themselves in the local culture. They drink kava, get to know the country’s history, and discover the darker side of humanity – cannibalism. Everything seems to be almost peachy until Sylvia gets pregnant and the couple is forced to search for proper medical care. Unable to find it in Vanuatu, they decide to move to Fiji.

Another great story created by Troost. It’s definitely different from his first book, nevertheless it is just as good. It is a comic travelogue-cum-touching memoir, in which the author shares his thoughts and reflections not only on finding paradise but also on discovering the true meaning of ‘home’.

‘Headhunters on My Doorstep: A True Treasure Island Ghost Story’ by J. Maarten Troost

Inspired by famous writers, newly sober Maarten decides to come back to his beloved Pasifika in order to retrace Robert Louis Stevenson’s route through the Blue Continent.

Following in the Scottish author’s footsteps, he travels from island to island, taking time to explore all the places he has read about. Somewhere along the way, his adventure turns into an amazing journey of self-discovery.

This book is not as light-hearted and amusing as Troost’s previous works. It’s much more serious; it’s personal and intimate; it’s focused on giving readers valuable insights into the cultures of the South Seas. The author’s style may have matured, but it’s still utterly unique. You will definitely have a lot of fun while reading this fascinating tale!