A HOLLY JOLLY CHRISTMAS

‘Christmas is a big holiday. Lots of feasts and kava drinking. Basically they do the same thing on all the holidays, eat and drink kava.’

Michael J. Blahut, Michael J. Blahut III, ‘Bula Pops! A Memoir of a Son’s Peace Corps Service in the Fiji Islands’


‘Gift giving is not a custom here. Christmas is a Holy day, but it’s nothing like what it is in the West, and there is certainly little if any commercialism associated with it at all.’

Dave Hart, ‘Solomon Boy: Adventures among the people of the Solomon Islands’


‘Living in Tonga, it is hard to believe that it is almost Christmas. It has little to do with the warm – make that hot – tropical weather, but more to do with the complete lack of Christmas commercialization here. There are no advertisements promoting last-minute Christmas sales and no obvious indication in the shops that Christmas is just about here. But make no mistake, this is a very Christian country, and Christmas will be celebrated in a big way.’

Steve Hunsicker, ‘Steve’s Adventure with the Peace Corps’


‘As Christmas approached, the Samoans definitely got into the spirit with decorated stores and Christmas music on the radio. Samoans don’t hesitate being blatantly Christian, and separation of church and state wasn’t practiced at that time. Local business people, government employees and bankers were expected to take time off from work to rehearse for these Christmas programs.’

Mary E. Trimble, ‘Sailing With Impunity: Adventure in the South Pacific’


‘Christmas shopping in Vanuatu has many of the same frustrations as it does in America. The traffic is terrible; one day I had to wait almost five minutes before I could make a U-turn. The weather is frightful, often over 90 degrees with high humidity. You can never find a parking space – Chinese businessmen don’t believe in wasting real estate on parking lots. However, the greatest challenge in Santo is not avoiding the over commercialization of Christmas. No, our challenge is finding something to purchase in the first place.’

Bryan W. Webb, ‘Hungry Devils and Other Tales from Vanuatu’

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