PACIFIC’S POLITICAL PAST

‘Meeting each other at those conferences gave leaders the chance to compare notes about their controlling powers: Australia, ready to grant independence; Britain, keen to do the same for all its colonies; France, anxious to keep control of its territories and delay self-government in the Franco-British Condominium the New Hebrides; New Zealand, itself part of Polynesia, ready to combine self-government with continuing support for its former colonies; and the United States, determined that the other colonial powers should decolonise but equally determined to keep control of most of its Pacific possessions.’

‘Through the 1960s and 1970s, the United Nations was an important source of encouragement and support for Pacific territories, most of whom were among the world’s last – and, some might claim, most poorly prepared – to achieve self-government or independence.’

‘Some leaders would have been happy to continue under colonial rule. Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara, sometimes a titled English gentleman, sometimes a high chief wholly committed to traditional ways, acknowledges in chapter six that he had no sense the colonial period was ending because “we were part of the Queen’s regnum; we were happy – why should we change things? (…)’

‘Other leaders were more philosophical. Sir Ieremia Tabai of Kiribati and Bikenibeu Paeniu of Tuvalu give the clear impression of accepting as a fact of life that Britain was departing.’

‘Self-determination and independence were just the first steps in empowering Pacific peoples. The early leaders faced many varied challenges. The colonization of no two Pacific countries had been alike.’

Ian Johnstone,‎ Michael Powles; ‘New Flags Flying: Pacific Leadership’

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