GREAT ANTHROPOLOGICAL READS ABOUT PACIFIC ISLANDS (PART 1)

‘Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilisation’ by Margaret Mead

This widely recognized book is a fieldwork classic. It details Margaret Mead’s journey to the South Pacific, where she had a chance to study the lives of teenage Samoan girls in the early 1920s.

Focusing on everything from education to sexuality, the author not only described one of the most fascinating Polynesian cultures, but also compared it to its American counterpart. After so many years, it’s still a brilliant read – interesting, well-written, insightful.

‘Nest in the Wind: Adventures in Anthropology on a Tropical Island’ by Martha C. Ward

Martha C. Ward first came to the island of Pohnpei in the 1970s. That little sojourn resulted in her marvelous anthropological study of the local people and their folkways. 30 years later she decided to return to the FSM to discover what had changed since her initial visit.

In this second edition of her original work the author unravels the peculiarities of life in the tropics, putting emphasis on the evolution of Micronesian culture. An absolute must-read!

‘Becoming Tongan: An Ethnography of Childhood’ by Helen Morton

Helen Morton’s book is a wonderful analysis of childhood in Tonga, in which she delineates all the processes associated with this crucial period in people’s lives.

Being married to a Tongan and having lived in the kingdom for over three years, she demonstrates a high level of competence in understanding the South Pacific ‘way of being’. In her study she traces the patterns of children’s socialization – from being ‘vale’ to becoming ‘poto’ – with great care and attention to detail. This makes her account an immensely engaging read.

‘Literacy, Emotion, and Authority: Reading and Writing on a Polynesian Atoll’ by Niko Besnier

This is a very interesting publication as it investigates literacy practices on the Nukulaelae atoll in Tuvalu.

Niko Besnier, Professor of Cultural Anthropology, visited the Ellice Islands numerous times between 1979 – 1985. During those sojourns he became interested in everyday forms of literacy and began to examine the close relationship between language, culture, and personhood. The result? A rather academic but certainly fascinating book.

‘Gender Rituals: Female Initiation in Melanesia’ by Nancy Lutkehaus, Paul Roscoe

Initiation rituals constitute an important subject matter in anthropological studies, and yet there aren’t many titles that cover this topic in regard to Pacific communities. Edited by Nancy Lutkehaus and Paul Roscoe book is one of such publications.

Throughout the volume, the authors analyse practices of eight different cultural groups of Papua New Guinea (mainly the Sepik region), explaining how they influence and shape the local societies. Although focused on women, the book will definitely be of great interest for both genders.

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